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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 293 (some duplicates have been removed)
nominated by president obama to be our ambassador to iraq. and i think all of us on the committee are pleased the president has nominated somebody of high caliber, great experience, who is our defense server vanessa the deputy chief of mission in baghdad for the year and previously served as ambassador to jordan and executive assistant to secretary of state, colin powell and condoleezza rice. while america's war has ended in iraq, the struggle for iraq's future obviously has not ended. the violence is down, but al qaeda and iraq remains a very deadly foe and iraq may not capture the jays today headlined. then no one should make the mistake to somehow come to a conclusion that iraq doesn't present extraordinary challenges. this administration has worked tirelessly to ensure that it doesn't become a forgotten front. we put in place a road mac on a browser to have issues. political, economic, educational, scientific and military. our bilateral partnership has potential to contribute, we believe to the stability in the middle east. but iraqi leaders have to decide for themselves what
production in the persian gulf. focusing mostly iraq. they speak about tensions between saudi arabia and iran. -- for the fall semester. and i would just mention in the way of an advertisement that we will be having our next program on october 23. it will be on jordan. jordan, i think it put a title out there of -- in the cross hairs again. we are fortunate to have the vice-president for studies at carnegie endowment for national peace. and a very good personal friend who will be coming as well as dr. kurt ryan, an associate of the latin .ppellati tonight as we gather, i always express my appreciation to the exxon mobil corp., which is a donor. it gives us substantial contributions each year to put on these programs, pay for expenses. and bring some of these guests from out-of-town. i think of them. tonight, we are going to focus on oil and politics in the persian gulf. and really focus on the prominence of this area and the energy market. the persian gulf area as 60% of the world's proven oil reserves. and 40% of the world's proven gas reserves. in fact, six of the top 40 in the countries in
as secretary general. it was iraq. it was a contentious issue. you spend a lot of time writing about this in the book and you reintegrate your thoughts that it was not a legitimate war. you write, it's 9/11 changed the world, the consequences of the iraq war were the similarly dramatic magnitude. why do you say that >> guest: i say that because the iraq war really left with the international community and i'm not just talking about the u.n. i'm talking about the impact on communities and groups in the middle east. and beyond. and the sense that the world has been broken in to groups and some were being targeted or profiles who felt very strongly about this, and this is about a war on which they the international community was divided. not approve it and i've personally believed we should have give the inspectors the weapons inspectors more time to do their work in iraq and come back with a report to the security counsel but the counsel had that won saddam hussein, that if you do not [inaudible] there would be serious consequences to determine the firstly whether he has performed with
invest 800 but with the nephew have real capital. . . and that's iraq. it was a very contentious issue and do spend a lot of time writing about it in the book and you reiterate your thoughts that it was not a legitimate war. you write, it if 9/11 change the world the consequences that the iraq war were similarly dramatic magnitude. why did you say that? >> guest: i say that because the iraq war led to major divisions within the international communities and i'm not just talking about the u.n.. i'm talking about its impact on communities and groups in the middle east and beyond and a sense that the world has been broken into groups and some were being targeted or profiled who felt very strongly about this and this is about a bar on which the international committee was divided. the council did not approve it and i firmly believe we should have given the inspectors, the weapons inspectors, more time to do their work in iraq and gotten back with a report to the security council but the council that heads wanted so dam -- saddam said there would be serious consequences to determine first w
the challenges iraq faces after the country has yet to finalize a law dictating the use of oil profits. tension continues to rise over the oil rights in the government of baghdad and the kurdish region. this is about an hour and a half. >> thank you for the policy event of the fall semester and i would just mention in the way that advertisement we will be having our next program on october 23rd and we will get a notice but it will be on jordan. i think i put a title belt there in the crosshairs and we are very fortunate to have dr. washer who is the vice president for studies of the carnegie endowment for the national peace, for our foreign minister of jordan and a free good personal friend who will be coming as well as dr. kurt ryan who is this a sea of political science at appalachian state university and a scholar and person who's written a lot about jordan. so that should be very interesting forum. but tonight, as we gather i always express my appreciation to the exxonmobil corporation which is a founder and a dillinger and gives us a substantial contribution each year to be able to put on
thoughts it was not a legitimate war. you say if 9/11 change the world, the iraq war is similar magnitude. why do you say that? >> guest: i say that because the iraq war really led to major divisions within the international community, and i'm not just talking about the u.n. i'm talking about the impact on communities and groups in the middle east and beyond the, and the sense the world has been broken into groups, and some are being targeted or profiled, who felt very strongly about it, and this is about a war on which the international community was divided. -- it was not approved, and personally believed we should have given the weapons inspectors more time to do their work in iran and come back with a report to the security council, for the council that warned saddam, if you do not perform there will be serious consequences, to determine, firstly, whether he has performed cooperatively with inspectors or not and secondly, determined what those consequences should be. obviously when it comes to use of force, any country, when attacked, has the right to defend itself. but when it comes
that it was not a legitimate war. that 9/11 changed the world from the consequences of the iraq war were similarly dramatic in magnitude. when you say that? >> guest: the iraq war rarely mentioned interaction with the community. i'm not just talking about the u.n. communities and groups in the middle east. and also beyond. the things that the world has been broken into groups, or some are being targeted or profiled, felt very who felt very strongly about this. this is about more on which the committee was divided. the council did not approve it. some believe we should been giving the inspectors the weapons inspectors more time to do their work in iraq and come back to the council, that if you do not perform, there would be serious consequences. to determine what those consequences should be. obviously, when it comes to use of force, any country one attack has a right to defend itself. but when it comes to broader peace and security issues, one cannot do it without the unique legitimacy of the figurative narration. >> host: is not a war that is still interested, although it is extreme terrorism, as it is ev
in building hospitals. they also pledge to work to promote export to iraq and to train personnel to operate such devices. >> e will work with the japanese government to raise iraq's medical capabilities. >> the equipment maker official added that his company hopes to provide the devices that will best suit iraq's needs. the japanese government has proposed a second site for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste from the accident at the fukushima nuclear plant. on thursday, senior environment minister visited the governor which borders foesh ukushima to south. suggested as a site, the national forest in the prefecture and explained the forest is far from residential areas, offers sufficient space and topographically and geologically stable. the governor replied he needs to consult with local residents and municipalities as the matter is very important to them. later he visited the city hall and met with the mayor to seek his cooperation. he is firmly oppose to the government's proposal. local residents also have mixed feelings. >> i understand there must be a site some where. i can't c
in geneva. in addition to the foreign ministers of the permanent five we had qatar, kuwait, turkey and iraq there, with the secretaries general of the arab league and the u.n.. and the whole idea was to review syria, not in the competitive sort of where this group supports but to come together to see how we can move forward. and we agreed on the need for political transition and political settlement. and came up with guidelines and principleses for political-- if you wish a road masically saying there has to be an interim government, an interim government that will have full executive power. we need to try and maintain the security forces so that people will be protected and particularly in a situation where they also have chemical weapons. that has to be protected. as well as insurance that governmental institutions do not collapse. nobody wants a chaotic collapse. and everybody agreed. all, and they were to come to new york and endorse that agreement. tha has n been done yet. >> why not? >> i think when they got to new york they did not focus on building on that substantive gain in again
, instead of focusing on iraq and saddam hussein. eichenwald writes -- >> to talk about the significance of these findings, we're joined by the author himself, kurt eichenwald, an award winning journalist and contributing editor at "vanity fair." his of a guest today is called, "the deafness before the storm." his latest book, "500 days: secrets and lies in the terror wars." we welcome you to "democracy now!" lay out the chronology for us but a lot of people know august 6, 2001, right before the september 11 attacks, explain then that memo and how you went back. >> that is the way to look at this, which is backwards. in 2004, the 9/11 commission hearings were saying, we want to see these presidential daily greeks. the bush administration fought releasing them. they finally released the august 61, which now have the infamous headline "bin laden determined to strike u.s.." in her testimony, condoleezza rice, the national security adviser at the time, said this was merely a historical document, a review of bin laden and al qaeda and what they've done. when you read it, that is what it was.
in return for stability and security, especially with the examples of instability in lebanon and iraq on their borders. and so, that was the mandate. that was legitimacy for the asides to rule. they lost that because of the policy and bashar al-assad unleashing the dogs in terms of cracking down the opposition. his policy in instability and insecurity. so he no longer has legitimacy. in a broader sense he is solid. whether he stays in power, he'll never have the mandate to rule again and legitimacy he once enjoyed. >> host: are western policymakers assuming his fall is inevitable? and should they? >> guest: that's interesting. i've been contacted by media outlets wanting a quarter to an obituary for about a year now. every time the call, i say it's premature because the regime has the wherewithal and maybe more importantly the willingness to stay in power and do what it takes to stay in power. so i think the united states and the west and others opposed to the assad regime have backed up these predictions of imminent demise. every time there is a prominent affection, everyone says the
officer. host: have you traveled overseas? caller: i have done two tours in iraq and two in afghanistan. host: what about president obama leaving iraq and planning to leave afghanistan? aq, he should've gotten a status of forces agreement with the government over there and we should of maintains an air base so we would have a presence. now we have left and recently there were saying how many shipments of weapons from iran are flying over iraqi airspace into syria to support the assad regime with all the atrocities committed over there. in terms of afghanistan, joe biden was the only person in washington who got afghanistan right from the beginning. if you look at the debate with the obama surge happened, when we were going to decide between $10,000, 40,000, and 80,000 troops, it was joe biden, he was the only one who said that, let's stick to our issues and our priorities. i was wounded in afghanistan during a a non-transmission, walking down the street in a dusty village that we were being pulled out of. i was nearly killed for essentially nothing, trying to bring some kind of ideal of
were very much focused on iraq, but you speak to the critics, and they will say that they -- it did not achieve what they were hoping to achieve. that really to train up the afghan armed forces. it provides a stable environment to a certain extent to allow that transfer of power, that training program to operate, but i'm not exactly quite sure whether or not, don, it's achieved its ultimate goal. in the process this has cost a lot of moy, and do date more than 2,000 u.s. soldiers have died. >> we have heard a lot about those green on blue attacks with the recent uptick in violence. especially those green on blue attacks. is there a timing problem here with the troop departure? >> it's certainly not ideal. you get the impression that everyone wants to get out of here. to tell you the truth, don, when you speak to troops off the record that is what they will definitely tell you. i mean, they've had to -- this was always kind of the plan that president obama boem when he gave the green light for this surge back in 2009, he said those 33,000 troops, they will be leaving come september 2
. about ten years ago, perhaps, iran was under direct threat. those who have occupied iraq and afghanistan were threatening iran on a daily basis. i do not believe that we are under any special conditions now from those sources, but the fact that the world -- historic period in the worlis coming to an end, an era during which power has set the first and last word. those holding the keys to power have set the fate of many populations. that era is coming to an end. >> the big catalyst for protests at the moment in the middle east was the video that was released which mocked the prophet muhammed. as a result, there was an attack as you know on the american embassy in benghazi in libya. the ambassador christopher stevens was murdered. do you condemn the attack which caused his murder? >> translator: fundamentally, first of all, any action that is provocative offends the religious thoughts and feelings of any people, we condemn. likewise, we condemn any type of extremism. of course, what took place was ugly, offending the holy prophet is quite ugly. this has very little or nothing to do with fr
/11, particularly because as we're talking about the iraq war that became a substitute for i think true patriotism which is speaking out on issues that are of importance to our national security. those are his exact words. yesterday said they. it kept getting worse. the pain he said he didn't like he actually used to like about a foot in america started liking it and so he stopped liking it. in that interview he actually refer to the american flag lapel pin as -- >> i won't wear that pin on my chest instead of going to try to tell the american people what i believe will make this country great. and hopefully that will be a testimony for my patriotism. >> you heard it right. you heard it right. he called it that 10. a little white bill clinton referred to that woman, remember? but not to fear. and not to were the president obama came around. that pain he stopped when because it didn't really show what was in his heart, he is now wearing near his heart today just about every day. it's one of those cheesy things you just have to do as president i guess. when he returns to civilian life, soon i hope r
taken us out of iraq. president obama who has waged a tough war against al qaeda and has gone off the leadership note tbli osama bin laden who has taken out from the terrorist on yemen -- and president obama because of the actions in the very pressive record has boosted american credibility in some parts of the world. governor romney has been trying to assert that president obama is not strong enough on foreign policy. he hasn't supported israel enough. or not as tough as he should be with china. i'm not sure that's getting through. i wonder if romney might be better adviced to articulate in a more detailed way how he would change american and foreign and security policy and how do we deal with china, russia, get out of afghanistan with i have 68,000 men and tbhim uniform in afghanistan. the debate start as you know next week, it looks like foreign policy will be a part part of the debate in the campaign. i think it's healthy we discuss the issues. >> host: i want your comments from out there from the viewers. for nicholas burns who is up in boston. he's teaching a harvard. he spe
president obama, who has taken us out of iraq, president obama who has waged a very tough war against al qaeda, has gone after the al qaeda leadership, notably osama bin laden, who has taken out some of the terrorists in yemen, including awlaki, an important terrorist figured there. president obama, because of his actions and his impressive record, has boosted american credibility in some parts of the world. governor romney has been trying to assert that president obama is not strong enough on foreign policy, that he has not supported israel and off, or has been not as tough as he should be on china. i am not sure if that is getting through, and i wonder if governor romney might be better advised in this campaign to articulate in a much more detailed way how he would change american foreign and national security policy on the big issues -- how do we deal with china, russia, how do we get out of afghanistan. we still have 68,000 american men and women in uniform in afghanistan. the debate starts next week, and it looks like foreign policy will be a big part of the debate in the campaign,
hard to get this dofnlt i hope we can confirm our ambassadors to iraq and afghanistan, and the continuing resolution to fund the government for six months. republicans say this congress has been unproductive. but if republicans want to know why it's been unproductive, they should take a look in the mirror. benjamin franklin once said, "well-done is better than well-said." close quote. "well-done is better and well-said." so it is time republicans stopped talking about how much they wanted to get things done and started working with us to actually get things done. the presiding officer: the republican leader. mr. mcconnell: yesterday dozens of republican senators came to the senate floor one after the other to register their complete frustration with the way democrats are running this place. never before -- never -- have a president and a majority party in the senate done so little to address challenges as great as the ones our nation faces right now. never. i mean, we've got a $16 trillion debt, and they haven't bothered to put together a budget in three years. they ha
have massive problems to deal with still in syria. >> there are clear parallels between syria and iraq. the biggest crisis of his time during the secretary general. he opposed the military occupation and his outspoken in his criticism for president bush's push for force. >> they were so determined to take action that i'm not sure they were ready to listen. when you're in that situation, you do make mistakes. you provoke others. >> he says the echoes of the war are with us all today, even in syria. >> the war in iraq exercised to the jihadists who rushed to fight. we are likely to see the same in syria if we do not handle it properly. >> that was last week for the c- span program, "after words peak of the most high-profile defector has described how they helped him escape his home land. french services helped him escape, but he refused to reveal more the details in the fear he could endanger people's lives. his defection was seen as a major blow to the damascus government. he is being touted as a potential figurehead for the opposition. members of the new parliament have elected and aca
the use of force against iraq, we would be on the wrong part of history. and it turns out to be that there was no anthrax in that file. >> rose: okay. a program note the prime minister mario monti was scheduled to be on our program, he will be on our program tomorrow night. tonight the prime minister of russia. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: sergey lavrov is here, he has served as russia's foreign minister since 204. he is in new york for the united nations general assembly. the conflict in syria is an essential focus. president obama spoke about the issue earlier today. >> in syria, the future must not belong to a dictator who massacres his people. if there's a cause that cries out for protest in the world today, peaceful protest. in a regime that tortures children and shoots rockets at apartment buildings. we must remain engaged to assure that what began with citizens demanding the rights does not end in the cycle of sectarian violence. together we must stand with those syrians who believe i
and well in the middle east including a resurgance in iraq and they are there in libya and this is a terrorist attack and they were foolish to deny it to start with. >> so how would you characterize the moment in our foreign policy? >> a moment of glaring weakness and chickens are coming home to roost. very briefly could i tell you in iraq it is unraveling. they just convicted the president to death penalty. al-qaida is resurgance. the relations between the three different enities sunni and shia and kurds is breaking down. iran is influence is increasing and iranian planes is flying over iraq to syria with arms for assad as we speak. in afghanistan we have had to adopt a policy and not training with the afghan troops, thoo moons they will not be ready to take over the responsibilitis and frankly they never were and so we have to evaluate our whole situation. the attack on the base in kandahar was the most offensive. we lost 200 million worth of airplanes in the death and tragic death of two marines and in syria, the massacre goes on. and finally in iran we continue on t
have decimated al qaeda. osama bin laden is dead. he said we would end the war responsibly in iraq. we've done that. he has restored relationships around the world. i spend every day up at the united nations where i have to interact with 192 other countries. i know how well the united states is viewed. i know that our standing is much improved. and it's translated into important support for strong american positions, for example -- >> is it inappropriate for governor romney to level the criticism he leveled? >> i'm not going to get into politics, david. that's not my role in this job. but i think the american people welcome and appreciate strong, steady, unified leadership, bipartisan, in times of challenge. and for those men and women in our diplomatic service, including those we tragically lost, they look to our leadership to be unified and strong. >> let's talk about leadership in the world, and as the nuclear threat from iran. another area of tension between the united states and israel. in just a couple of minutes, we will show our interview with the prime minister of israel, benj
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 293 (some duplicates have been removed)